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counterterrorism, and then the u.s. ambassador to china, gary locke, on the relationship between the two countries. >> our first experience was to come in a different way than every other family up here. probably never happen again in history. and it's interesting because after dad was sworn in, we went and took a picture, photo of the family, behind the oval office desk, and that night we didn't get to move into the white house because nixon had left so quickly, so unexpectedly, they left their daughter and son-in-law, david eisenhower, to pack all their clothes and belongings. it literally took seven or eight days. we had to go back to our little house in alexandria, virginia, suburbia, the neighborhood was surrounded by secret service. we had been living there dad was vice president. and i'll never forget. that night mom is cooking dinner. literally, we're sitting around the dinner table, and mom is cooking dinner, and she looked over at my dad and goes, gerry, something is wrong here. you just became president of the united states and i'm still cooking. >> steve ford, linda johnson robb, and j
out of african nations. >> last month, china's communist party selected a new president, and other leaders for the country. tuesday, at the center for strategic and international studies, the assistant secretary of state for east asia will discuss china's leadership transition and how it might impact u.s.-china relations. on c-span 3 at 5:30 p.m. eastern. >> at the new york state museum. this is our gallery that is dedicated to the history of september 11th and the attacks in new york at the world trade center. we decided with the gallery, to tell the story for the first moments of the attack, using objects and photographs from the world trade center site. this piece of steel from the south tower, floors seven threw nine, we put it in the place where the public can touch it. gives the visitor a tangible experience. this is the piece of steel from the north tower, floors 71 through 74. this is the dramatically bent piece of steel. this is the site of impact on the north tower, and you can see the openings where the windows have been and the pieces of the metal that would have held a
lessons in your book -- this may sound like a stretch, the people who live in china. i mean, this government's, it is -- you know, i don't know whether you call it -- certainly there is not the openness. well would you say to the leaders of china about there future? >> well, i would start by saying that the chinese leaders have drawn lessons from the story. the chinese leaders know this piece of history. of course, there's a similar time in their own history. and they also have studied very carefully the 80's in the end of the soviet union. and one of the decisions that they have made based on studying this piece of history is, they have made contemporary china less totalitarian in the sense that they do make people march in parades and they have abandon ideology in the sense of making people repeat things they don't believe in. and the pressures they put on people are coming in that sense, less. it is a much more subtle system where you are allowed to say some things in some context, but not others. you can talk about corruption, but you may be cannot criticize the party di
in china, right clicks and they are creating it. most of the technologies done in china. here's a driver, here's a mick jagger. you know, that's what it's like. so we built the best headphones in the world. took us two years to make one and the money market or culture that we build and control. >> do you think that would've been possible in an earlier media era? >> welcome e-mail come it took been scared to death to be motivated to do this, right? stars look at the record industry in spain for two myers house and there is people all the time. i'm not the record guys that gets invaded. i went there and somebody say gee, you know, it was 2002 and i'm really sorry about your business. flick were talking about my grandfather dying. if it meant, that doesn't work for me. i used to be in the coal business. how did i end up in the same? i said i'm going to do something else that caught doug morris said you know what, if they're not going to pay for right now to buy her music, maybe i can figure a way to charge them to listen to it. and that's how the headphones started. [applause] >> icu applau
supportive of the president's decision china cabinet secretary, particularly secretary donovan into the bad because it recognizes while fema has primary roles in damages caused by the storm and to a certain degree to mitigate future impacts, much of the infrastructure preexisting condition and long-term housing needs are best addressed to existing authoress programs that will need more funding. as we look at the supplemental, were not just looking at the drs. we're looking at the whole range of federal programs that will be required to successfully recover communities, restore them to sustainable economies. part of the post-katrina reform act that the groundwork for this commitment and shared. there would be no disaster recovery framework unless congress directed it. it would be no framework for secretary donovan to begin with. the legacy is still a go, tools we did not have we now have. another two were to not have was the team sent in before the storm hit. previously would have to be for governors to experience double dose station before they ask for assistance but for the can respond. co
back -- so it's a vast multitude on the planet but no self-government in russia, and china and india and africa, most of europe. you look back through the previous millennia and you have democracy and self-government existing in very few tiny city states, athens because they can't defend themselves militarily and even when it did exist people would speak the same language and worship the same god, the same climate and culture, a very small little area. that is all of world history. and you look today, democracy is half the planet. if you asked me what changed, what was the hinge of all of that i think i would say the word we the people. 225 years ago the hinge of world history because all of the conclusions at the time it was way better and more perfect and for the first time ever in the history of the planet, an entire continent got to vote on how they and their posterity would be, and there were lots of exclusions from our perspective that we wouldn't exist as a democratic country in the democratic world but for that. i would say it's the hinge of all modern history. before democra
met him when he worked with haley bailey 18 years ago in china. he was a great divan. he's a great guy now. i hope you're good to meet him. it hadn't been for him, we wouldn't be here tonight. so, and jackie, wherever she is. they are. without her the invitation list would have been a mess. i have no alan simpson for just over 40 years. i heard of the story sophisticated than i try to do them myself. and he helped me out of that hole. i worked 18 years. as press secretary in chief chief of staff responsible for all mistakes. [laughter] wayne al went to retire and went to harvard, i went to the smithsonian and was in charge of government for a wild man. my wonderful wife, rebecca who is right here. i'm telling you i could not have done this book without you. she did with research and out of me being up at 4:00 in the morning and she is amazing. so we went overseas and did a bunch of work with charities and children and blind people and lepers and came back and ended up on a sailboat in one day in 2005, the phone connected for some reason to some island power in your brain and it was all
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7